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 Greetings from a nerdy gaymer

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Loran
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PostSubject: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Fri Jan 07, 2011 10:01 pm

Hi there, I'm Loran (real name is Olof or Olle, Loran is just a name from Stargate...), I'm a seventeen year old nerdy (but not dorky) Swedish gaymer who has three cats who suprisingly manages to put up with my baby-talk and forced cuddling...

Anyway, I'm a nerd and a fan in almost everything, if you want me to procure a list of everything I have one at the ready, but I can say in advance that I am not a fan of Star Trek, since I consider that it rapes science, if that's not too bold to say. I have a tendency to write little sci-fi/fantasy short stories from time to time, which I may or may not dump here for public display. I am also a terrible grammar nazi, and even though I hold it in most of the time I may sometimes be unable to restrain myself, but mostly I settle for a little footnote at the end of a lenghty post...

Apart from my grammar-naziness there are some other things about me that you should know, since it may or may not turn up in my posts, such as extreme post length, subconscious humour, and most importantly: my knack of trailing off-topic during a single post (although I use more effort to supress these urges than I use to supress the urge to comment on someone's grammar), most often induced by political statements, correction of scientific slaughter, and the mentioning of (or in any way reminding me of) certain hot/cute/gorgeous/interesting men, such as Jamie Bamber, Matthew Bomer or any other man with piercing eyes...

Oh, what was I talking about again? Right, I was introducing myself! Am I done? I think I'm done...
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Fri Jan 07, 2011 11:15 pm

Hi, Loran, it is good to see you here. Come meet the gang. You may find us a bit silly at times but we do take our games seriously. We could use some action in the voice actors area. Lot of talk there but little action. Jezdamayel has not been feeling well.

sakura, our mascat, greets you as well.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sat Jan 08, 2011 12:34 am

Hi Sakura!

Well, I'm not much of a voice actor; I can't act, I hate the sound of my own voice, I don't have any decent recording equipment and I'm not sure I can shake off the Swedish accent enough for decent voice acting anyway. But I'll contribute to this forum in any way I can! Very Happy
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:25 am

You could always go for the Chicken in the Basket stuff Laughing welcome Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sat Jan 08, 2011 11:24 am

Loran, I felt the same way myself just a few months ago. I can't do unique voices but I have had fun learning to do what I can with my voice. What is wrong with a swedish accent. I have an American accent. Silvery tells us she has a British accent. Still waiting to here it.Smile

You play games, yes? Post about your games. Join us in the nonsense in the Lounge. Start a topic that interests you. Just relax and be yourself.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sat Jan 08, 2011 1:33 pm

Welcome Loran.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:24 pm

Hi Loran and welcome Smile
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:26 pm

Oh, and by the way I'm the same Loran from The Engineering Guild.
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 2:25 pm

Hello Loran! (or Olof or Olle). I hope we'll see each other around!

But *some* Star Trek is good (meaning the originals and Next generation)... Smile

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:39 pm

Triactus wrote:
But *some* Star Trek is good (meaning the originals and Next generation)... Smile

I used to watch Quantum Leap all the time so I like Enterprise. T'Pol is more pleasing to watch than Spock. This is one thing that anyone has to concede to Star Trek Enterprise! Laughing

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 3:45 pm

I had a crush on Spock I watch ST-original, STNG and ST-Enterprise. Also watched Quatrum Leap, Babylon 5, Stargate. I love science fiction.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 9:39 pm

I worship Stargate just as much as I worship Doctor Who, it's a perfect show wich has a certain charm to it without being silly, and they base the technology and the "science episodes" on actual practical or theoretical science, rather than Star Trek that just make things up and alter the laws of physics to fit with the script, as the writers never care for the science and they have "advisors" to fill in the blank (they've admitted it themselves, so don't try to defend them).

Stargate has a perfect blend of humor, action, plot and science which makes my bells jingle by just thinking of it. It is logical, realistic, and it takes you for one hell of a ride. It's too bad the franchise got shot down by the horrible programming strategies for Universe (and a too large change in style, which unfortunately recovered way too late in the show).
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 9:49 pm

As much as I have fond memories of Star Trek, I have to admit that to me, the best Sci-Fi I have seen is Battlestar Galactica (the remake of course!). The series is deeply rooted in human drama, the characters are very interesting and have all their strengths and flaws. The actors are also very good (Edward James Olmos understood perfectly what is a strong silent type and plays it well. And James Callis is stellar as the goofy yet cunning Gaius Baltar).

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:31 pm

I have some fond memories of the original Battlestar Galactica series (the one with Dirk Benedict). I was really young but I remember watching it (I even remember watching it in black and white). I don't remember that much except how scary the Cylons were. The remake is good and I agree with you Triactus but I liked the original Starbuck more. The best character in the new series is certainly Dr. Gaius Baltar.

I don't think "realism" is a valid criterion for science fiction. If the imaginary world makes sense then I don't care if it violates the laws of physics (or more accurately what we know about these laws). The starships in Dune are probably more "realistic" than most starships in Star Wars but it doesn't mean that the battles between starships in the original and the new trilogies are not fun to watch (not much "realism" as far as battles between spaceships are concerned in Star Wars I'm afraid).

I'm not saying it's a bad show but I don't like Stargate that much. I saw the original picture when it was released back in 1994 and I didn't care for the way some scenes were shot (especially the battles -it's no surprise that the director Roland Emmerich ended up shooting Independence Day -summing up all the things I don't like in big Hollywood movies) the story was great though and Kurt Russel and James Spader were very good (as always). The glorification of the military really turned me off. I watched the series when they first aired but although it was great to see Richard Dean Anderson in a new series I cared very little for the characters. Then again I couldn't stand the military element.

My favourite science fiction series is definitely Firefly. It had everything that a great show needs and like many good shows it was cancelled before it could reach its true potential. The characters were cool and charismatic and despite being incredibly badass they were humans, they had doubts, they had fears, they sometimes failed. It's a pity it didn't last longer.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Tue Jan 11, 2011 11:57 pm

Sci-fi is something that's supposed to be somewhat realistic, it can be based on theoretical science and perhaps even be taken close to the edge of realism, but if you go any further than that then you've entered the realm of fantasy, where there are forces that can bypass the laws of nature.

Anyway, I agree with you both on the facts that Battlestar Galactica is an amazing show wich brought pure humanity into the science fiction genre. And that Firefly was and always will be one of the best TV-series out there, I cannot count the numer of times that I've watched the episodes and don't even get me started on Serenity, I'm surprised the video file isn't corrupted yet...

And I have to agree with your statement that the original flick was pretty 'meh', but it did lay out the basis for an amazing TV-show, much like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, which is one of the worst movies ever made, and one of the best TV-series ever made. But I don't think that they glorify the military, in a number of episodes they do actually adress the flaws in the military and the struggle to have a civilian rule over the Stargate Program, which can lead to some nasty talk and at times even some nasty reactions. Although I'm glad that they (I'm talking about the people in that world, not the series creators) agreed on having a civilian lead of the expedition to Atlantis and the ruling of the place itself.

But I think that it's for the better that the Stargate is in military hands, since there are a lot of nasty things out there and until we can have such peace as we did with the help of the Aschen (they did try to exterminate us in the end and it had to be solved by time travel, but they did make the Stargate open for use by the public) I think that it's the smartest way to go, since the Stargate is our last line of defence.

Oh my, that's a long post...
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:21 am

Loran wrote:
Sci-fi is something that's supposed to be somewhat realistic, it can be based on theoretical science and perhaps even be taken close to the edge of realism, but if you go any further than that then you've entered the realm of fantasy, where there are forces that can bypass the laws of nature.

I think that we agree but that I'm considering this issue in a much broader sense. Science is after all a way to understand and represent reality, it is not reality itself. To understand reality we should be talking about philosophy not science... I guess we could go back to Plato but that shouldn't be necessary. Wink

I don't think that hard science is the only valid science fiction option, far from it. Any science fiction writer who would try to expand on scientific facts and existing theories to write a novel or a script would probably make mistakes but since this is something that we can only figure out with hindsight it's hard to tell who is right and who is wrong... For obvious reasons that sort of science fiction doesn't age very well (there are exceptions). Jules Verne foresaw many things but he didn't necessarily got all the details right.

What is probably more important is the verisimilitude of the universe. In other words that the universe follows rules that are logical (at least according to the conditions that are set in this universe) and give that world the appearance of being real... There is a huge difference between being real and having the appearance of being real -after all we can be said to live our lives in a world of appearances based on faulty sensory stimuli that allow us to recreate our own "virtual" realities because the "true" reality keeps eluding us as it remains beyond what we can actually perceive with our limited senses (it seems I went back to Plato and the Allegory of the Cave after all).

Fantasy is not a bad word. Contrary to what the word would seem to imply, there are rules in fantasy. There are rules but they are different and the actual difference makes the setting interesting. Middle Earth for instance is ruled by laws that are similar to the ones we know but there are some elements that differ. In most cases the violation of these laws incur a penalty (for example the artificial longevity that the One Ring grants is not without a hefty price). Elves in this world are probably more attuned and more balance than humans. They live in harmony with these laws that don't apply to them in exactly the same ways (which doesn't mean that these laws don't apply to them).

What about science fiction? There are many things that are part of our lives now that do "bypass the laws of nature" as mankind perceived these laws a few centuries ago. Who can say what the future has in store for humankind? Cold Fusion? Antigravity? Teleportation? Faster than light propulsion? Think about the Human Genome Project, Fifteen years ago it looked like an almost insurmountable task... Things are moving incredibly fast and the possibilities are endless.

Why would it be "unrealistic" to picture a world in which a new theory would prove the theory of relativity to be wrong? Faster than light travel has been a very common element of many science fiction novels and movies for decades. I'm not saying that the explanations these novels and movies provide are convincing but that they don't necessarily ruin the verisimilitude of the worlds that they depict.

Of course we're not talking about dreams. Dreams (usually) don't make sense. Dreams don't follow logical rules. Nevertheless dreams can be used in science fiction if the violations of logic are limited in scope and inform the psyche of the dreamer (or dreamers). Dreams in science fiction are usually very important. In Frank Herbert's Dune and most novels and stories by Philip K. Dick dreams are used in relation to visions and prescience and as such they can establish a paradox... The most common example of this is to be found in prophecies. If a character can see the future then for this character to be able to change events before they occur establishes a paradox as the visions would turn out to be false; if the future can't be changed then the gift of prescience becomes almost useless. That is something that can be seen as the centre of Dune. Such a paradox wouldn't be possible in a world that wouldn't be subjected to rational laws. You can't "violate" laws that do not exist.

Of course science as we know it can't explain everything yet and I doubt that it will ever hold all the answers. It would be really a sad world if we didn't have the thrill of the unknown to urge us to move forward and explore the great beyond...

Science fiction is the realm of possibilities. Imagination should be the only limit to the infinite number of worlds that can grow out of our thoughts.

This is a very long post and I hope you won't mind that I got carried away like this as it is a fascinating subject. Very Happy

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:51 am

Smile I am beginning to think this may be the way to handle more serious discussions; sneak into a thread like this one.

According to mathematical rules an infinite number of worlds or universes can exist. The trick is to figure out a creditable way to move from one universe to another. This is more easily done in fantasy than in science fiction. Time travel is used in a lot of science fiction and does cause paradoxes.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 2:02 am

I've given some thought about the distinction between science fiction and fantasy. I understand how they are used by editors to sell books but I have a hard time labelling some works. What about Jack Vance's stories? Some can be classified but others have elements that belong to both fantasy and science fiction. What about Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern series? Or Roger Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber? It's not always that easy to draw the line between fantasy and science fiction.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 2:17 am

I don't mind at all, but I do mind that you jumped to conclusions and assumed that I hated fantasy and that it was something that was without any kind of rules, and that I hated any sort of deviation from hard fact in sci-fi, which I actually said to the contrary, as I wrote it is okay to use theoretical science and push the limits a little bit.

As for the subject of Fantasy, I know for a fact that almost all fantasy stories have their own laws of nature when it comes to magic and the like, Christopher Paolini (the inheritance cycle) did it exceptionally well, and even The Sorcerer's Apprentice (the movie) had a very scientific view on magic, and J.K Rowling says she made countless of rules and laws for her magic, determening what was and what wasn't possible to do. I have a similar opinion, if not more fanatical.

In the world of my books, I imagined the existance as being made out of pure void (no space, time or anything at all) with only one speck of stuff that actually existed, it contained about a hundred universes (ours is one of the oldest and biggest) and the universes are held together next to each other by another plane of existence which envelopes them and a bit of the void at the fringe, a plane consisting purely of energy, and filled with landscapes and creatures made out of different kinds of energy, not just the one that the universes are made out of. Our nickname to this plane is the Spirit World, and our nickname to the energy which can freely enter our realm, turn into our energy, and then back into its original state in the plane, is magic.

I'm not going into details on magical creatures and objects, since that would be a much longer post than this one, but I am going to tell you in short how we humans use magic. Humans and other humanoid creatures that use magic are usually called magicians (wizard is a really bad word to modern magicians familiar with Earth culture, so don't call them that), other non humanoid creatures use magic differently, and I am going to tell you why right now.

Most of the beings in the spirit world are stuck there, but there are some kinds that can travel to this world, and most of them do so to take hosts, they latch on to the host in the early stages of neural development (all intelligent creatures have these beings in them) and feed off of the creature's emotions (it's like candy, it tastes good but isn't very functional), often pushing the buttons on those emotions that are the most powerful, such as joy, love, pleasure and anger, older and more experienced ones know which buttons to push to get the most without too much consequences for the host. And what do we call these beings? Souls.

Here's the interesting part, souls are from the spirit world, and keeps a connection with them at all times. The soul is carefully attuned to your mind, and thus you have a direct link with the spirit world, and the magical energies within. But only with the right combination of an experienced soul of the right kind, a host with significant brain power and an unusually powerful bond between the two can make a magician, and for a magician to do more exact magic than just the instincive outbursts of energy linked to your emotions through your soul you need a stronger connection to the spirit world, and you get that by bonding yourself and your soul to a kind of being called a keeper. The Dark keepers are old, wise and powerful, while the Bright keepers are young, foolish and selfish. The bonding is too complicated to explain here, but it often requires aid of another who is already bonded. And you don't want to bond with Bright keepers, as they will probably try to make use of you or forget to give you energy.

And what does a keeper do? Well (and here comes the part you've been waiting for) it takes the right kinds of energy from the spirit world and sends it to you soul, which bends and forms it to suit the situation in which you use it (the soul always does this without question, as it doesn't really care what you do), and how does the keeper know which energies to give? Well, you use passwords.

You either say actual words and sounds, make hand or body gestures, makes a certain dance, mixes certain objects and/or ingredients in the right way or whatever, often with some form of mental input. The knowledge and discovery of these "spells" comes through study and experimentation, this is partially to have some form of order with those that use magic and to make sure that those that use it know what they are doing.

Now I'll just skim through the subject of witches, which will be explained in a more comfortable enviroment in my story here in the forum. Witches are people with REALLY powerful souls, and they need neither spells not keepers to draw magic, but the problem is that they can have a keeper, and even then they don't need spells. A witch with a keeper is a powerful witch, and if the witch is weak enough then the keeper might use him or her (most witches are actually men, about two thirds are) as a puppet or, if the witch is powerful and the keeper is weak, then the witch may draw as much power as he or she would like. Neither of these circumstances have good outcomes and both are feared and prevented with alot of measures, such as assigning magicians to keep check on witches so they won't bond and so that they will learn how to use the magic they have.

There we go, now I've proved that I'm not a fantasy hater and I have no problem with theoretical/fictional science as long as they are within the realms of logic, and this is just the tip of the iceberg, don't even get me started on the topic of Wanderers...

(the reason that this is all so detailed is because according to my doctor I have an almost dangerously hyperactive brain, which constantly thinks and comes up with stuff and pieces it together, even when I think of other stuff, it's both annoying and rewarding, it's the cause for the detail in the fictional science of my world, the lenght of my post and the reason that I am sitting and writing all of this in three in the morning just because I must)

PS. In the case of time travel I have made time linear in my world, as it is the most straight forward thing to do, and time travel is basically impossible (at least to the past), but I like the time in Doctor Who, were only certain points are fixed while others are in flux, and anything can happen between those things, and that time isn't a line, it's more of a big ball of wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey stuff.

Also, FTL travel is impossible, because it is, but there are workarounds, such as the mass effect fields in Mass Effect, there's also hyperspace and wormholes (those three are the most likely to be practical in our world, and wormholes are actually mathematically possible), then there's warping (which requires an unlimited source of energy and is likely to tear all matter in the universe apart), slipstream (a form of hyperspace where you "glide" in currents of gravity, if gravity now works that way, but it's more of a form of tension rather than a flow of particles) and other stuff. Now I am going to go to sleep.

PPS. Fantasy is to me a more free form of sci-fi, and often incorporates more abstract elements then sci-fi and often have a medieval setting, but there are a lot of subgenres to deal with weirds blends, such as steampunk and cyberpunk.
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 1:39 pm

Quote :
I don't mind at all, but I do mind that you jumped to conclusions and assumed that I hated fantasy and that it was something that was without any kind of rules, and that I hated any sort of deviation from hard fact in sci-fi, which I actually said to the contrary, as I wrote it is okay to use theoretical science and push the limits a little bit.

I assumed that you valued science fiction and hard science more because of what you said (and your professed dislike for Star Trek) and more particularly this part of your previous post:

Quote :
Sci-fi is something that's supposed to be somewhat realistic, it can be based on theoretical science and perhaps even be taken close to the edge of realism, but if you go any further than that then you've entered the realm of fantasy, where there are forces that can bypass the laws of nature.

You can't blame me for drawing such conclusions when you hint in your post that to you the difference between science fiction and fantasy is that fantasy is disconnected from reality.

Anyhow I don't care about getting into a senseless argument to try and prove that reality doesn't really exist. Smile Especially since we agree on the most important point, i.e. that rules exist even in fantasy.

Quote :
Also, FTL travel is impossible, because it is

No offense but that is rather short-sighted because we can't possibly know what is possible and what is not possible. Just because it looks impossible doesn't mean anything. It may seem impossible to us now but there is no telling what will be possible in the future.

The examples you list are just explanations that books, games and TV shows have come up with. Nothing more.

Quote :
Fantasy is to me a more free form of sci-fi, and often incorporates more abstract elements then sci-fi and often have a medieval setting, but there are a lot of subgenres to deal with weirds blends, such as steampunk and cyberpunk.

I agree on the medieval setting but not on the rest. Cyberpunk has not much to do with fantasy (except in the case of Shadowrun).

When you say that fantasy "incorporates more abstract elements" I'm afraid that it doesn't make much sense to me because science fiction primarily deals with "abstract elements" whereas fantasy includes supernatural elements and magic (and magic is something that usually can't be explained away according to the laws of nature but turns out to be a law unto its own).

It gets rather complicated when you consider novels that include both science fiction and fantasy. For instance Moorcock's History of the Runestaff featuring Dorian Hawkmoon in a post apocalyptic Europe in which technology has dwindled back to medieval times but with remnants of technology that appear as magical for the characters (and defy our current scientific knowledge).

Then what about pure science fiction stories that include fantastic or supernatural elements? In many ways William Gibson Neuromancer (the most influential cyberpunk novel and the one that established the genre) could be said to bear some similarities with a ghost story... And I could go on about supernatural elements in novels by Philip K. Dick or in Frank Herbert's Dune novels.

It's really not that hard to find science fiction novels that verge on the supernatural.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 3:38 pm

1. You're forgiven for those assumptions.

2. Matter travelling faster than light is as far as our most reverred scientists can tell, completely impossible, since it would either cause the matter to desintegrate or travel in time, as Einstein explained. Also, only slipstream is purely fictional, wormholes, hyperspace and spacial distortion (warping) are scientifically recognised terms, although only hyperspace has yet to be proven, which may take time. Spacial distortion is most often caused by matter pushing space out of its way, causing tension which is responsible for keeping all matter together and is also why planets orbit the sun (and possibly why electrons orbit the atomic core (I'm not sure if that's the english term...)) Wormholes are proven both theoretically and mathematically, so at some point in the future we WILL be able to make one, so suck on that!

Ahem.

3. Please remember that I wrote that in three to four in the morning, and thus I was really tired, cyberpunk and steampunk were the only ones that I could come up with. Also, now that I'm awake and alert I can finally say what I was trying to say: there is not a single concrete defenition of either science-fiction nor fantasy, it's all in the perspective of the observer and/or creator. But I think science-fiction applies best to both, as magic can be considered a fictional kind of science depending on how the author chooses to portray it, and fantasy itself is an extremely wide and ambigous term which can apply to almost anything.

There, I think that said it Razz
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 4:09 pm

Loran wrote:
1. You're forgiven for those assumptions.

You're too kind, I was ironic, try not contradicting yourself too much if you want people to understand what you're trying to say. Very Happy

Loran wrote:
2. Matter travelling faster than light is as far as our most reverred scientists can tell, completely impossible, since it would either cause the matter to desintegrate or travel in time, as Einstein explained. Also, only slipstream is purely fictional, wormholes, hyperspace and spacial distortion (warping) are scientifically recognised terms, although only hyperspace has yet to be proven, which may take time. Spacial distortion is most often caused by matter pushing space out of its way, causing tension which is responsible for keeping all matter together and is also why planets orbit the sun (and possibly why electrons orbit the atomic core (I'm not sure if that's the english term...)) Wormholes are proven both theoretically and mathematically, so at some point in the future we WILL be able to make one, so suck on that!

"Suck on that"? I guess you're trying to be funny but that makes you sound like a twelve years old... Rolling Eyes

Anyway, our "most reverred" scientists are just as knowledgeable as little children compared to what scientists will know in the future (unless we destroy mankind first of course).

That's a very narrow view of things as scientists today have a very limited understanding of what we've been referring to as reality.

You assume Einstein's theory is more than what it is... a theory.

Loran wrote:
3. Please remember that I wrote that in three to four in the morning, and thus I was really tired, cyberpunk and steampunk were the only ones that I could come up with. Also, now that I'm awake and alert I can finally say what I was trying to say: there is not a single concrete defenition of either science-fiction nor fantasy, it's all in the perspective of the observer and/or creator. But I think science-fiction applies best to both, as magic can be considered a fictional kind of science depending on how the author chooses to portray it, and fantasy itself is an extremely wide and ambigous term which can apply to almost anything.

There, I think that said it Razz


What you're saying doesn't solve anything, it's not an answer. If we assume that the definition is up to "the observer and/or creator" it means we are just pushing it under the rug. .. That's certainly not a scientific approach.

Science fiction usually depicts a future in which science has progressed beyond what we believed to be possible and thus presents man struggling with a world that is different from our own but in such a way that it may still be relevant to our own reality. Fantasy usually adds magic and supernatural elements.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 6:02 pm

As I said, I wrote it late at night, and I corrected myself, I wasn't contradicting myself. (in fact, you seem to be contradicting yourself quite a lot with the whole genre defenition thing)

As for the 'suck on that', I was not being immature, merely pretending to be for humor. But now I'm putting a stop to this conversation, as we obviously have different opinions, but I hope that there are other topics that we agree in.
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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 6:18 pm

Loran wrote:
As I said, I wrote it late at night, and I corrected myself, I wasn't contradicting myself. (in fact, you seem to be contradicting yourself quite a lot with the whole genre defenition thing)

As for the 'suck on that', I was not being immature, merely pretending to be for humor. But now I'm putting a stop to this conversation, as we obviously have different opinions, but I hope that there are other topics that we agree in.

That's too bad as I would have liked to know when I did contradict myself so I could clear that up for you. I've always said that the distinction was tricky. Wink

By the way I don't think we have to agree to exchange ideas -it's more interesting that way. But if you want to put an end to this discussion I won't insist.

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PostSubject: Re: Greetings from a nerdy gaymer   Wed Jan 12, 2011 6:27 pm

I just wanted to put a stop to it before it turned into a flame war, that's all. I have experience with this, both in forums and in real life, the discussions can be very civil but can turn really hairy really fast.

The tricky thing about science is that we know so little, and the more we learn the more we realize how little we know. But there are a lot of things that are certain to me, since they are (to me) the most logical and realistic. I'm kind of like the elves in The Inheritence Cycle (the Eragon books), I believe in what I can percieve and understand, I ponder about what could be, but I only believe in them if there is solid proof or logic or reason for it to exist. Disagree with me on this if you will, but this is how my mind works and there is nothing that can change it.

Now, should we discuss the weather in stead?
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